0 Items | £0.00

VIEW BASKET

Sword Art Online music: Luna Haruna

Wednesday 26th February 2014


Tom Smith on the Gothic Lolita who overflies all the competition

Luna Haruna

Meet Haruna, the artist behind Sword Art Online’s third ending theme; Overly. At the age of twenty she managed to land her dream job as a singer. And not just any singer; an anime singer!

Haruna was obsessed with everything to do with anime and manga, particularly some of the fashion styles employed in a number of series. Even her outfit in Overfly’s music video is influenced by SAO’s character designs.

As a young teenager she was a regular indulger of the Gothic Lolita and Harajuku look, as well as an avid reader of KERA, Japan’s alternative fashion magazine. By the second year of senior high school she was already appearing in the pages of her favourite publication.

While Luna’s popularity as an amateur model continued to rise, she made sure not to forget about her love for singing. Since the age of five, when she first heard the theme songs of Sailor Moon, she had wanted to make it her goal to be an anime singer.

In junior high she had already made steps in the right direction by triumphantly landing her first theme song in Rental Magica – the internet radio off-shoot of the popular fantasy franchise. However, her popularity would really blossom when she would enter the 2010 Animax Anison Grand Prix – the X Factor of the anime song world.

The Animax Anison Grand Prix is an annual talent search held across several of Japan’s cities. It’s hosted by the anime television network Animax (if the name wasn’t too much of a clue), and a series of celebrity judges, music producers and record label execs judge young hopefuls singing their hearts out in hopes for a recording contract for the theme of an upcoming anime.

Haruna didn’t manage to win the event, but getting through to the finals did bring her plenty of attention. The experience influenced her to take music more seriously, so she spent the following year practicing singing full-time. In that time she released her first song with LisAni! (‘Listen Anime!’), the magazine for anime-song fans. The track was called Binetsu no Tsuki, and it got her attention in all the right places. SME Records soon swooped in, signed her up, and the rest, as the cliché goes, is history.



To date, Haruna Luna has only two maxi-singles tucked under her frilly petticoat; the four-track Overly single, with the title track being used as an ending theme in Sword Art Online; and her very first major label debut Sora wa Takaku Kaze wa Utau, including the second ending theme to the anime series Fate/Zero. Both EPs are available in full worldwide on iTunes. She has a handful of others, as well as a full-length album entitled OVERSKY, but they have yet to be made available outside of Japan.

Haruna Luna’s song Overfly is the ending theme to Sword Art Online Part 3, out on UK DVD and Blu-ray from 24 February 2014 courtesy of Manga Entertainment.

Buy Sword Art Online Part 3

MANGA UK GOSSIP

Sword Art Online Part 3 (episodes 15-19)

£13.99
sale_tag
was £19.99
Although Kirito cleared SAO and returned to his real life, his adventure was far from over. Kirito found that Asuna was in a coma in the hospital. Meanwhile, Nobuyuki Sugou of RECTO, the company that took over SAO property, tries to get married to Asuna while she is in a coma. Hearing that Asuna has been spotted in the virtual game called Alfheim Online (ALO), Kirito decides to dive into the virtual world once again. With the help of Leafa, Kirito rushes to the World Tree where Asuna is supposedly imprisoned.

FEATURED RELEASE

RELATED BLOG ARTICLES

Sword Art Online

Matt Kamen levels up on the RPG to end all RPGs
Kazuto Kirigawa is a reclusive teen, most of his free time invested in video games. As one of the few people selected as a beta tester for Sword Art Online, he’s been anxiously awaiting the final version for a chance to return to his unreal life as ‘Kirito’, his avatar. He’s not alone – advance buzz has been positive, and with the first production run limited to 10,000 units due to the proprietary virtual reality helmet, it’s been an instant sell out. Release day goes smoothly – until players realise it’s impossible to log out.

Sword Art Online Music: LiSa

Tom Smith on Sword Art Online's LiSa
Salarymen to the left of me, shoppers to the right. And here I am, stuck in the middle with otaku. Well, more accurately I’m frolicking with them, in Hibiya Open-Air Concert Hall, a concrete amphitheatre that’s dwarfed by the towering skyscrapers of Tokyo’s business district to the west, and high-end retail haven Ginza to the east. Between the two is the venue, hidden in the peaceful Hibiya Park. Peaceful, that is, until 3,000 anime fans descend en masse, clutching chunky glow batons, wearing identical shirts and all waiting for the latest lady-singer that tickles the tastes of otaku to hit the stage; LiSA.

SWORD ART ONLINE MUSIC: HARUKA TOMATSU

Digital transvestite Tom Smith on the girl who’s hearing voices
Before taking on the part of Asuna, Haruka Tomatsu had accumulated over one hundred titles featuring her vocal talents, spanning anime, videos games and drama CDs. Achievement unlocked.

Sword Art Online Music: Eir Aoi

Tom Smith on a singer’s internet fame
INNOCENCE, at the time of writing, has been Eir Aoi’s biggest selling, awarding her a peak position of six in the weekly Oricon chart.

Sword Art Online Music: LiSa

Tom Smith on Sword Art Online's LiSa
Salarymen to the left of me, shoppers to the right. And here I am, stuck in the middle with otaku. Well, more accurately I’m frolicking with them, in Hibiya Open-Air Concert Hall, a concrete amphitheatre that’s dwarfed by the towering skyscrapers of Tokyo’s business district to the west, and high-end retail haven Ginza to the east. Between the two is the venue, hidden in the peaceful Hibiya Park. Peaceful, that is, until 3,000 anime fans descend en masse, clutching chunky glow batons, wearing identical shirts and all waiting for the latest lady-singer that tickles the tastes of otaku to hit the stage; LiSA.

SWORD ART ONLINE VS SUMMER WARS

Andrew Osmond says, if you like that, you might like this…
Summer Wars and Sword Art Online are made for a generation who’ve grown up with and within virtuality: social networks, video streaming, games without borders or ends. Both anime are adventures about things going wrong in cyberspace, but neither are technophobic; on the contrary, they’re all about hugging the avatar.

RECENT FEATURED POSTS

Where is Victorian Romance Emma?

Why do we get Downton, but not Emma?
Fans of K-On! The Movie’s lovely and realistic vision of London may not be aware that in between that film and Steamboy’s loving depiction of a steampunk-era Manchester and London rests a show that is as accurate as either, and yet is also arguably the most English anime show ever made. Yet it still cannot be bought on DVD in the UK itself.
Live-action remakes of classic anime titles are the subject of controversy and fan-rage in the anime community - Akira being a rather hot topic on that front, but could this be the saviour we’ve been looking for?

Gatchaman Crowds

Warning against surprise attacks by alien galaxies from beyond space
The colourfully mad Gatchaman Crowds is one of those anime which isn’t happy unless it’s doing umpteen things at once, all seeming completely different. It’s a campy, lowbrow action show and a thinky piece of SF and an otaku series with a taste for the meta and it’s anxious to engage with the real world. You can watch it just for the tangerine colours and the shouty panda. But if you want more pointers, read on…

Appleseed: Alpha

The CG movie reviewed
With a series of box-ticking MacGuffins, wandering-monster encounters and vaguely defined side missions, Appleseed: Alpha feels all too often like one is watching someone else playing a computer game, not the least because several crucial moments are bodged or oddly framed, so that it is not always clear what’s going on.

MIRAI MIZUE AND JAPANESE ART ANIMATION

Jasper Sharp on how wonders will never cease
The tradition of the solitary animator continued past the establishment of an anime industry, with notable luminaries such as Yoji Kuri, Kihachiro Kawamoto and Tadanari Okamoto positioning themselves outside it and creating works that challenged what could be done with the medium, often using other media such as stop-motion and silhouette.
December’s here and it’s time to start thinking about gifts and stocking fillers for your nearest and dearest, or maybe just what to put on your own Christmas list!

Kite: the Movie

A live-action remake of the anime classic
Right, hands up those of you who have been betting on which 1990s anime would get a Western live-action remake first. Ok, who had Ghost in the Shell? Evangelion? Cowboy Bebop? But Yasuomi Umetsu’s notorious sexed-up actioner Kite (1998) has beaten them all to the screen, starring anime fan Samuel L. Jackson.
Contact Us   |   Refund Policy   |   Delivery Times   |   Privacy statement   |   Terms & Conditions
Please note your card statement will show billing by MVM. Sword Art Online music: Luna Haruna from the UK's best Anime Blog.