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Thursday 1st January 1970


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K-on! Season 2 Complete Collection

£29.99
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was £39.99
The show's not over until the band says it's over!
Sometimes music and words come together so perfectly that the combination is far more powerful than either would be alone. In much the same way, the five members of the Sakuragaoka Girl's High School's Light Music Club have become far more than just a group of girls with similar interests. More, even, than just a group of friends. Through the medium of music they've found a common course in life, and whatever the future may bring, they know they can get through it if they stand together. Which makes the coming end of the school year and the graduation of the four older members something that's dreaded as much as it's looked forward to. But in the meantime there's so much going on, it's as if life has decided to throw everything it can at them. Going to music festivals won't be hard to swing, but running a marathon? That will be a stretch! Yearbook photos? The horror! And a school play with Mio and Ritsu cast as Romeo and Juliet? Ooo, VERY awkward. And then, of course, there's one big final performance for the band! The tempo is rising and emotions run wild as the final encore approaches in K-ON!! Season 2 Collection 2!!

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Helen McCarthy grabs the mic for K-On!
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