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Thursday 1st January 1970


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Bleach Series 15 Part 2 (episodes 330-342)

£26.99
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was £29.99
A New Threat to the Soul Society Arrives!
In their bid to assume control of the Soul Society, Kageroza's Reigai imposters turn out to be as powerful as their Soul Reaper originals. A weakening Ichigo and the others attempt to train Nozomi to reach Shikai, possibly their key chance to defeat Kageroza. But there is still more to the mod soul Nozomi than meets the eye... Head Captain Genryusai Yamamoto joins the battle, but when Nozomi is taken captive and Ichigo's powers become increasingly unstable, the outcome is anybody's guess!
Contains episodes 330-342.
Special Features: Omake, Clean Opening and Ending.
Spoken Languages: English, Japanese, English subtitles.

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