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FIVE THINGS TO PREPARE YOU FOR LIFE IN JAPAN : PART 2

Friday 17th July 2015


Hopefully you found the first three offerings in ‘part one’ informative. So without further hesitation, let's complete the list:

4. Opening a bank account
This. Nearly. Killed us. It was my second day in Tokyo and I needed to open a bank account, which turned out to be a ridiculously hard task for a foreigner. Very few banks have English speaking staff and those that do have a labyrinth of admin and regulation you must navigate through or the answer will ALWAYS "sorry, we can't help".fed-upSome banks will not let you open an account without ownership of an Inkan (sometimes called a Hanko) which is a small, personalized stamp that stands in for a signature in Japan. Signatures are worth diddly-squat here, I have tried to pay my rent and my phone bill in Japan with a signature-authorized standing order (always a paper form, no online system in sight) and every time it has been rejected.

Soooo, no Inkan, no account. We tried the next place…and the next…and the next after that. After many weary rejections, we finally found one; Shinsei bank. Sadly, even they wouldn’t give me an account without a phone number. I walked out of the bank well and truly at the end of my tether and called my company for assistance. Their advice? Lie.

I instantly saw the flaw here; I had just told the bank staff that I had no phone yet, now I was expected to waltz back in there having magically pulled a one out of my arse. With this reservation thrown aside out of sheer desperation, I attempted to deceive my new native hosts. Did they buy it? Not for a split second. I cobbled together an explanation that this number (Fraser’s) was in fact mine and it would be ‘activated’ the following morning. I was descended upon by staff and managers alike and GRILLED. Warm welcome expired and a noticeable change in temperature in the room, I noticed Fraser slowly backing out of the room with his young son behind him, like a scene from Jurassic Park. Unfortunately even the best fibs will simply break against cool logic, ‘if your phone is being activated tomorrow, come back then’. Bugger.

It’s a vicious cycle, you cannot get a phone without a bank account and you cannot get a bank account without a phone.AngryHowever, as it turns out, you can go somewhere like Softbank (a large network provider in Japan) and beg them to let you have a pre-paid phone account. This is essentially pay-as-you-go, you can buy a basic flip phone for around 5,000 yen (30 quid) and then charge your account. It's painfully minimal (phone calls only, no texting) and very expensive at over 100 yen a minute, but it gets the job done. Japanese phone companies make next to no profit from pre-paid contracts, so understandably they don’t like giving them out to foreign devils.

Get one; give the number to the bank clerk and in about 20 minutes you’ll have a new bank account. As I did…the following morning.

 

5. Getting a decent phone

If, like me, you start to get fed up of not being able to check Facebook every few seconds or actually communicate with all the awesome new friends you’re making, you might want to upgrade to a smart phone at some point. This is very hard, but by no means impossible.

Again, technicalities tend to get in the way and it’s always the same old stuff; visa length, lack of a credit card and the inability to setup a direct debit with your bank…

Most places rejected me. I sat in a Softbank shop for an hour going through options with the long suffering store clerk, when we finally made a deal and signed the paperwork, my card would not work in the machine.  I have a cash card here like most people…the Japanese work in cash. Lack of a chip means you need a credit card to pay for things, I didn’t have this so I had to leave with nothing to show for my trouble. Except an angry clerk.TantrumIn my fourth month without a smartphone and bloody determined, I went to Docomo and the guy there just tried to ignore me. Then I used Google translate to get his attention and he told me (through atrociously translated written text) that my visa was not long enough for a two year contract. As I was mid-rebuttal,  the phone rang and I think he saw this as a get away vehicle; when I asked him if there were any other options he spent an inordinate amount of time on the phone, walking around the store and occasionally pointing to the same phrase on the laptop screen, ‘your visa is not long enough, I cannot help you’.

Thanks.NO-THANKSNow good and ready to blow my brains out I staggered into an AU store. Salvation! A store clerk that could speak English! Things were looking up. Quite the failure veteran now I made all the potential pitfalls clear; I couldn't speak Japanese, I had no Inkan, no credit card and my visa was only a year long. Oddly, this seemed to be no issue so we went ahead with the sales pitch. I picked an Android phone and got completely buggered with the add-ons, the reason seemed to be ‘you’re foreign so you can either like it or…like it’.

When we got to the end, around two hours later, she pulled out the card machine, and I was nearly sick on the desk. She must have seen my change in pallor because she recommended we just try it. Luckily for me, after a few phone calls to superiors, it transpired that I could, in fact, set up a cash payment system by paying my phone bill in a convenience store once a month. I signed (sacrilege!), thanked my unbelievably helpful clerk and left the store with a brand new phone and the option to cancel the contract whenever I wanted.

I. Won.FMASo there you go, I recommend going to an AU store explaining what you lack and how long your visa is and you should be able to get a cancel-able contract for about 7,000 yen a month. Not exactly cheap but you get all the internet you can eat. It's the Izakaya of phone contracts.

That’s it then, a regaling of the most difficult things I’ve had to procure so far. I’ve only been here for five months, so I’m sure there’s a lot more to come. This may be helpful for you if you’re thinking of heading out here or you could just laugh at my incompetence if you aren’t.

Here are a few things I highly recommend if you are attempting any of this:

  • 1. Either learn a decent amount of Japanese or take a friend who speaks Japanese, it's indescribably helpful.

  • 2. Allow at least three times longer than you think it will take for each task. It always takes a lot longer due to translation issues and an archaic record system.

  • 3. Don’t give up. There are times that you swear they are doing this on purpose because you’re not Japanese. Just remember that it isn’t personal and Japans retailing and business structures are still a good 15-20 years behind the western world. The staff really do want to help you, their hands are just tied.


Be strong, be smart and Japan becomes your Sea-Urchin. If you’ve been at all put off by my experiences though, you should keep in mind that bad things happening is a rite of passage in life and, most importantly, when you have gone through all of this you will feel like you own the place…and have a great anecdote or two.

Go have fun!

MANGA UK GOSSIP

Akira (the Collector\'s Edition) Triple Play Edition (incl. Blu-ray, Dvd, Digital Copy)

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Iconic and game-changing, Akira is the definitive anime masterpiece! Katsuhiro Otomo’s landmark cyberpunk classic obliterated the boundaries of Japanese animation and forced the world to look into the future. Akira’s arrival shattered traditional thinking, creating space for movies like The Matrix to be dreamed into brutal reality.

Neo-Tokyo, 2019. The city is being rebuilt post World War III when two high school drop outs, Kaneda and Tetsuo stumble across a secret government project to develop a new weapon - telekinetic humans. After Tetsuo is captured by the military and experimented on, he gains psychic abilities and learns about the existence of the project's most powerful subject, Akira. Both dangerous and destructive, Kaneda must take it upon himself to stop both Tetsuo and Akira before things get out of control and the city is destroyed once again. 
AKIRA The Collector’s Edition features both the original 1988 Streamline English dub and the 2001

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