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Thursday 1st January 1970


MANGA UK GOSSIP

Harlock Space Pirate

£14.99
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was £19.99
Far, far in the future, or perhaps the distant past... 500 billion displaced humans long to return to the planet they still refer to as home. Captain Harlock is the one man standing between the corrupt Gaia Coalition and their quest for complete intergalactic rule. Seeking revenge against those who wronged both mankind and himself, the mysterious space pirate roams the universe in his battle cruiser, the Arcadia, defiantly attacking and pillaging enemy ships. Gaia Fleet leader Ezra sends his younger brother, Logan to infiltrate the Arcadia and assassinate Harlock. But Logan will soon discover that things are not always what they seem and that legends are born for a reason.
Based on original characters and stories created by Leiji Matsumoto.
Includes bonus DVD disc containing the original Japanese edit with English subtitles and over 40 minutes of extra content.

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