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Thursday 1st January 1970


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Mardock Scramble: The Third Exhaust

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Rune Balot's struggle to bring the man who killed her to justice continues amid the world of high-stakes gambling and glamour at the Eggnog Blue Casino. The odds are stacked heavily in the house's favor, and even with the aid of Dr. Easter and Oeufcoque, a universal item capable of turning into anything and everything, Rune's chances of winning are slim. But winning the golden chips containing Shell Septinos' memories is only the next step on a long and treacherous road.
Run will still have to live long enough to bring those memories before the court, and even that isn't the end of the journey. Rune's search for answers to the questions that haunt comes to a shattering climax!
Contains both the television version and director's cut of Mardock Scramble: The Third Exhaust.
Spoken Languages: English, Japanese, English subtitles.

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