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Thursday 1st January 1970


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Bleach Series 14 Part 2 (episodes 304-316)

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Ichigo vs Aizen: let the showdown for the sake of the two worlds begin!

Humans and Soul Reapers realize their powerlessness against the astonishing might Aizen obtained through the Hogyoku.

They once again owe their salvation to Ichigo, back from his training between worlds. More mature and more power ful, has the young man really reached a new stage of his evolution? Will he finally match for the relentless Captain Aizen?

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