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Akira Screening Times

Thursday 23rd June 2011

Akira

Katsuhiro Otomo's anime classic Akira is going on a UK tour -- your chance to catch the remastered, hyper-sonic anniversary digital print in a real cinema. Help us celebrate twenty years at the top by seeing the one that started it all. And keep celebrating at home with the Blu-ray...!

24th June-30th June: London Barbican Centre.

2nd July: Oxford Picturehouse, Harbour Lights Southampton.

4th July: Aberdeen Picturehouse, Exeter Picturehouse, York Picturehouse, Norwich Picturehouse, Tyneside Cinema.

7th July: Stratford East Picturehouse

12th July: FACT (Liverpool)

13th July: Hyde Park Leeds

18th July: Ritzy (Brixton)

22nd July: The Folly Project, Hackney Wick.

26th July: Regal Picturehouse (Henley on Thames)

31st July: The Aubin, London.

Akira Screening Times

MANGA UK GOSSIP

Akira Remastered Special Edition

£3.99
sale_tag
was £19.99
Neo-Tokyo, 2019. The city is well on the way to rebuilding after World War III. The central characters, Kaneda and Tetsuo, two high school drop-outs, are members of a joy-riding motorcycle gang. In the opening scene, Kaneda and Tetsuo stumble upon a secret government project to develop telekinetic humans, apparently for use as weapons. Tetsuo learns of the existence of his 'peer' Akira, the project's most powerful subject, and determines to challenge him...

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Helen McCarthy examines Katsuhiro Otomo’s landmark Akira, then and now
1988 in Japan: Yamaha Motors won the J-League but Nissan won the Cup. Western pop divas Bananarama, Kylie and Tiffany were on TV. Japanese real estate values climbed so high that the Imperial Palace garden was worth more than the State of California, and Tokyo’s Chiyoda ward had a higher market value than Canada. The Government signed the FIRST Basel Accord, triggering a crash that wiped out half Japan’s stock market. Katsuhiro Omoto’s movie Akira premiered on 16th July.

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Your chance to see it in the cinema in the UK
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