0 Items | £0.00

VIEW BASKET

Meet the voice cast of Casshern Sins

Wednesday 20th July 2011


Matt Kamen stalks the voice cast of Casshern Sins to see where their wanderings took them next.

Casshern SinsCasshern – Tohru Furuya. Furuya is a voice acting legend, bringing Gundam’s Amuro Ray, Dragonball’s Yamcha and Sailor Moon’s Tuxedo Mask all to life. He has returned to the role of Amuro several times, as well as serving as the narrator of Gundam 00. In the same series, he portrayed Ribbons Almark, though he did so under the pseudonym Noboru Sogetsu. Most recently, Furuya has been voicing the ‘legendary hero’ AkaRed in the live action steampunk superhero series Pirate Task Force Gokaiger – a crimson warrior who embodies the combined powers of the 35-year Super Sentai series: the ultimate Power Ranger!

Lyuze – Nami MiyaharaLyuze – Nami Miyahara. The badass female cyborg Lyuze was a departure for Miyahara, whose earlier career saw her in light-hearted adventure comedies such as Magic User’s Club and Magical Doremi. Following the end of Casshern Sins, you can find her in mermaid fantasy Sea Story, military musical girls drama Sounds of the Sky (aka So Ra No Wo To) and, most recently, the lead character’s sister, Akari Tsukumo, in Yu-Gi-Oh! Zexal. Playing an endless card game is probably relaxing after Casshern’s apocalypse....

Ringo – Yuko MinaguchiRingo – Yuko Minaguchi. Fans of Dragonball Z probably know Minaguchi as the voice of Gohan’s paramour Videl (and later their daughter, Pan), though many of her roles see her playing characters similar to Ringo – cute, innocent and just a bit.... squeaky. Besides Pan, other well-known characters Minaguchi has lent her vocal chords to Sailor Saturn in Sailor Moon, Yaone in Saiyuki: Reload and Akiko in both versions of heartwrenching romance series Kanon. Recently, she broke this pattern for cute and kind characters by voicing Queen Mercelida, the promiscuous ruler of the netherworld in the questionably sexualised Astarotte’s Toy, and most recently had a guest spot on last season’s Is This a Zombie?

Ohji – Yuichi NagashimaOhji – Yuichi Nagashima. Veteran actor Nagashima really gets into character – so much so, he now insists on being credited as ‘Ch?’, after his role in live-action educational show Tanken Boku no Machi! In Casshern Sins, he’s the voice of Ringo’s guardian Ohji and followed his young charge’s actress Minaguchi into roles in Astarotte’s Toy and another guest spot on Is This a Zombie? “Cho” is also one of the biggest dub actors in Japan, where native viewers will hear him on western series such as Teen Titans, Transformers and Looney Tunes!

Luna – Akiko YajimaLuna – Akiko Yajima. Although not in every episode of Sins, Luna is a pivotal character and her voice actress Yajima has the credentials to match that importance. Following on from major roles in Inu Yasha, Gundam Wing and The Big O, and a supporting role in Naruto as Ranmaru, you’ll next be able to hear Yajima as Angela, one half of a hermaphroditic angel with a split personality in the upcoming Black Butler! That’s certainly something creative to look forward to, wouldn’t you say…?

The second and final volume of Casshern: Sins is out now on UK DVD from Manga Entertainment.

MANGA UK GOSSIP

Casshern Sins Part 2

£11.99
sale_tag
was £24.99
Casshern � a cybernetic assassin with no memory of his past � awakens in a corrosive wasteland where nothing survives for long. A plague known as the Ruin sweeps across this once-vibrant world, reducing everything in its path to rubble and scattering any chance for salvation. Robots and humans alike � or what little remains of them � seek vengeance against Casshern for the life he took and the role he played in their Ruin. A machine built to kill, Casshern murdered the last hope for this world, but now, lost in a future he does not recognize, he will fight to save the dying.

FEATURED RELEASE

RELATED BLOG ARTICLES

Katsuhiro Otomo's Akira then and now

Helen McCarthy examines Katsuhiro Otomo’s landmark Akira, then and now
1988 in Japan: Yamaha Motors won the J-League but Nissan won the Cup. Western pop divas Bananarama, Kylie and Tiffany were on TV. Japanese real estate values climbed so high that the Imperial Palace garden was worth more than the State of California, and Tokyo’s Chiyoda ward had a higher market value than Canada. The Government signed the FIRST Basel Accord, triggering a crash that wiped out half Japan’s stock market. Katsuhiro Omoto’s movie Akira premiered on 16th July.

Akira's Ancestors

Andrew Osmond on the unexpected forerunners of Neo-Tokyo
In Akira’s opening moments, a sphere of white light appears from nowhere in the centre of Tokyo, and swells to obliterate the city. Many Western critics saw the image as a symbol of the Bomb, like the earlier Japanese pop-culture icon, Godzilla. But the designer apocalypse could be taken as Akira’s own mission statement – to be a new kind of entertainment, blowing away its peers and reshaping the cinema landscape.

The Impact of Akira

Andrew Osmond reviews the reviews from 20 years ago.
On its explosive arrival in the West, Akira crossed the Pacific to catch the generation that grew up on the films of Spielberg and Lucas; it was also the generation that read adult superhero strips such as Watchmen and The Dark Knight Returns. Akira, though, offered the shock-and-awe widescreen violence akin to that of enfant terrible live-action director, Paul Verhoeven. For example, both Akira and Verhoeven’s Robocop (1987) have a gory money-shot scene in their early minutes, in which a luckless bit-part player is graphically torn apart by a hail of bullets. Unsurprisingly, such imagery excited reviewers.

Akira 25th Anniversary Screenings

Your chance to see it in the cinema in the UK
Neo-Tokyo is about to E.X.P.L.O.D.E. Katsuhiro Otomo’s debut animated feature AKIRA had its Japanese premiere on 16th July 1988. We are very proud to celebrate the 25th Anniversary of what is undoubtedly, one of the most celebrated animated movies of all time. Voted by Empire readers as one of the top 100 best films ever and cited by everyone from James Cameron, Ridley Scott, Daft Punk and Kanye West as a massive influence on their work, AKIRA kick-started the anime business all over the world, opening the doors for everything from Pokémon to Princess Mononoke.

The Art of Akira

Joe Peacock tracks down the original images from the anime classic
Watching Akira for the first time provokes a universal reaction of awe. And justifiably so: there’s often an overwhelming sense among audiences that this animated film is unlike any other they’ve ever seen. Casual viewers won’t be able to put their finger on it; they just know that Akira is visually striking. Art and illustration aficionados appreciate the intricacy of individual scenes, sometimes pausing the film to appreciate the detail in a particular frame.

Katsuhiro Otomo's Akira then and now

Helen McCarthy examines Katsuhiro Otomo’s landmark Akira, then and now
1988 in Japan: Yamaha Motors won the J-League but Nissan won the Cup. Western pop divas Bananarama, Kylie and Tiffany were on TV. Japanese real estate values climbed so high that the Imperial Palace garden was worth more than the State of California, and Tokyo’s Chiyoda ward had a higher market value than Canada. The Government signed the FIRST Basel Accord, triggering a crash that wiped out half Japan’s stock market. Katsuhiro Omoto’s movie Akira premiered on 16th July.

RECENT FEATURED POSTS

We’re super excited to welcome you to the Manga UK booth over Comic Con weekend - we’ve got loads of events and competitions planned and the whole team is raring to go!
The news many anime fans have been waiting for has come at last. Attack on Titan Season 2 will start airing in Japan Spring 2017!

One Piece Film Z

Send in the Marines!
One Piece Film Z, out Monday on UK DVD and Blu-ray from Manga Entertainment.
Today we question Animatsu and Manga UK's Marketing Manager, Andrew Hewson.

Short Peace

Jasper Sharp on the anthology movie currently touring the UK
There have been three Japanese works nominated in the Academy Awards category for Best Animated Short Film over the past ten years or so: Koji Yamamura’s Mt. Head (2002), Kunio Kato’s The House of Small Cubes (2008) – so far the country’s only winner – and most recently Shuhei Morita’s Possessions (2013). For all that, it remains pretty difficult for most viewers who aren’t regulars on the specialised festival circuit to catch such examples of cutting-edge animation.

Gargantia on the Verdurous Planet

Culture shocks and military musings, in Gen Urobuchi's hard-hitting anime
"It’s an interesting time to have a hero with a militarist outlook. This blog has discussed the arguments over the alleged political content in the blockbusting Attack on Titan and Ghibli’s film The Wind Rises. In both cases, the controversies connects to Japan’s own militarist past in the 1930s and ‘40s, and the spectres they conjure up in countries round the world; of Japanese kamikaze pilots, of torturers ruling POW camps, of the so-called “banzai charges” of soldiers sworn to die for their Emperor."
Following on from our Japanese voice actresses article, it's time to share with you our favourite English language voice actresses:
Live-action remakes of classic anime titles are the subject of controversy and fan-rage in the anime community - Akira being a rather hot topic on that front, but could this be the saviour we’ve been looking for?

From Naruto to Fairy Tail

Paul Browne on the music of Yasuharu Takanashi
Two high-profile Manga Entertainment releases have something in common in the form of musician and composer Yasuharu Takanashi. It’s the distinctive musical strokes of Takanashi that appear on the new Naruto movie The Lost Tower as well as the upcoming movie addition to the Fairy Tail series – Phoenix Priestess.
Contact Us   |   Refund Policy   |   Delivery Times   |   Privacy statement   |   Terms & Conditions
Please note your card statement will show billing by MVM. Meet the voice cast of Casshern Sins from the UK's best Anime Blog.