0 Items | £0.00

VIEW BASKET

Fullmetal Alchemist: Brotherhood OVA Collection

Thursday 15th November 2012


Andrew Osmond says goodbye to Fullmetal Alchemist… again


Fullmetal Alchemist: BrotherhoodIt’s the sad time when we have to say goodbye to another anime epic, with the release of the Fullmetal Alchemist: Brotherhood OVA Collection. Okay, we said one farewell to the series with the final TV box-set last year (which was chronologically the end of the story), though recently we’ve had The Sacred Star of Milos to tie us over. As a cinema film, Milos was a big adventure for the Elrics and company. These video releases are small yet significant, four short stories plus a heap of comedy skits. The stories throw fresh light on the characters and their journeys; the sketches show the BONES studio pre-empting fans by lampooning their own saga.


The four main stories are set before the TV series, or in the early days of the brothers’ adventures. The first tale shows the Elrics as they were when we met them, travelling as a pair, exploring their world, innocently optimistic about finding a spell to restore them to normal. In “The Blind Alchemist,” they hear of an alchemist who’s succeeded where they failed so horribly, a man who’s perfected human transmutation. The brothers hotfoot to an elegant chateau, where the alchemist serves a lady and her little girl. The little girl’s presence will ring alarm bells if you remember the early TV episodes; the resolution this time is different, but still dark. Ed’s damning last line is a challenge to the audience, dividing viewers over whether he’s right or not.


The brothers return in the second story, “Simple People,” which is a much lighter tale of the Elrics with Winry. The youngsters’ relationship is still in its spiky phase; when Ed snaps his automail in a fight, Al glumly wonders if Winry will throw a spanner or a wrench at them! It’s a slice-of-life tale, juxtaposed with the show’s life-or-death conflicts, as the kids’ comic squabbles are contrasted with the view of sharpshooter Lieutenant Hawkeye.


The third story, “The Tale of Teacher,” is the most comedic, about the young Izumi, the brothers’ terrible schoolmarm in the ways of alchemy. You may remember how, in the TV show, she exiled the Elrics to an island to live or die. Now we see the 18 year-old Izumi’s own trial, as she battles to become an alchemist on the snowy slopes of Briggs Mountain, turning into a bigger terror than any of the locals. A meet-cute postscript suggests the best pick-up line for a lady like Izumi would be, “Excuse me, you dropped your bear.”


The last story, “Yet Another Man’s Battlefield,” is perhaps the strongest. It’s another training tale as army cadet Roy Mustang, not yet the revered Flame Alchemist, struggles through training. He befriends two people, both of whom look very familiar, although only one of them is who we think he is. This is a story of male rivalries, friendships and shared traumas, as the tale moves from the academy to the bloody Ishvalan war. If you see the war as Vietnam, then it’s perhaps it’s not too fanciful to think of the story as homaging its near-namesake, Stanley Kubrick’s Full Metal Jacket.


After that heavy drama, you can move on to the wonderful DVD extra, “Fullmetal Four-Panel Comic Theatre.” It’s the anime equivalent of one of those quickfire TV contests where comedians deliver lightning jokes – the subject here being, “Ways to make fun of Fullmetal Alchemist: Brotherhood.” Memorable scenes are mocked, and tragic highlights skewered. Remember that bit with the phone booth? Wait till you see how different that looks if the operator sticks you on hold and forces you to listen to Mustang’s singing!


Fullmetal Alchemist Brotherhood 4 OVA is out on UK DVD and Blu-ray from Manga Entertainment.


Buy it now



Fullmetal Alchemist: Brotherhood OVA Collection

MANGA UK GOSSIP

Fullmetal Alchemist Brotherhood Four

£15.99
sale_tag
was £24.99
Alchemy – the mystic science of transmutation. Gifted alchemists can break down and reconstruct matter using the “Law of Equivalent Exchange,” creating miraculous things. But one taboo can never be broken - human transmutation. The Elric brothers Edward and Alphonse broke the taboo in an attempt to resurrect their late mother and as a result, lost everything. Al’s soul was transferred to a suit of living armor and Ed lost two limbs, confining him to mechanical auto-mail. To recover what they’ve lost they embarked on a journey to find the fabled Philosopher’s Stone. The closer they get to the hidden truth of the Philosopher’s Stone, the deeper they fall under shadowy schemes and the perils of unnatural creatures. The military nation of Amestris, the grudges and hatreds of a persecuted people, and the countless tragedies caused by alchemy all form a dark vortex that will draw people and countries into its void. The Elric brothers forge ahead in their quest to transmute despair into hope...

FEATURED RELEASE

RELATED BLOG ARTICLES

High School DxD

Hugh, phew, barneys and boobs, cutthroats, demons and blood...
If this show dropped all the extreme fan-service it would still be an exciting action-horror adventure, not far removed from an extended arc of Supernatural or the like. As it is, you get that and a show that would have broken the jiggle counter if anime DVDs still had them. After decades of evolution, even harem comedies can produce a show with some substance.

Sword Art Online Music: LiSa

Tom Smith on Sword Art Online's LiSa
Salarymen to the left of me, shoppers to the right. And here I am, stuck in the middle with otaku. Well, more accurately I’m frolicking with them, in Hibiya Open-Air Concert Hall, a concrete amphitheatre that’s dwarfed by the towering skyscrapers of Tokyo’s business district to the west, and high-end retail haven Ginza to the east. Between the two is the venue, hidden in the peaceful Hibiya Park. Peaceful, that is, until 3,000 anime fans descend en masse, clutching chunky glow batons, wearing identical shirts and all waiting for the latest lady-singer that tickles the tastes of otaku to hit the stage; LiSA.

RECENT FEATURED POSTS

Berserk Movie 3: The Advent

Anime's answer to the Red Wedding... but what was the question...?
The BBFC, which rated the first two Berserk films '15,' rated the third part a hard "18," with "sexual violence, strong bloody violence and strong sex." Believe us, they’re not kidding.

Gareth Edwards: From Factory Farm to Godzilla

The director’s path from Sci-Fi London to Hollywood
“We pulled all our favourite moments from Akira and had this library of reference, so whenever we got stuck, or we ever felt like a sequence wasn’t inspired enough, or we didn’t know exactly how to give it that edge to made it feel as epic as we could, we would always thumb through the Akira imagery and suddenly get a wave of excitement or a new direction.”

Naruto Music: Okamoto's

Tom Smith on Naruto Shippuden’s 18th ending theme
As Naruto ups the ante and swears to take on Sasuke alone in box set 18 of Naruto Shippuden, the team responsible for the encompassing episodes’ ending theme have also took it upon themselves to up the pace.

Mondo Does Ghost in the Shell

Strange things afoot at SDCC booth #835
On sale now at the San Diego Comic Con in a limited edition of only 325 prints, Kilian Eng's beautiful Ghost in the Shell poster for Mondo. It's a thing of beauty made specially to commemorate the 25th anniversary.

Tajomaru: Avenging Blade

Jonathan Clements goes in search of groove in a grove
Tajomaru: Avenging Blade is part of a trend in filmmaking that has seen a number of Japanese classics approached from new angles. In Hollywood, we have the Satsuma Rebellion retooled in The Last Samurai, and Keanu Reeves already at work on the forthcoming Forty-seven Ronin. Within Japan, Sogo Ishii’s Gojoe (2000) replayed a famous samurai legend with a gritty, glossy, pop sensibility. Shinji Higuchi’s Hidden Fortress: The Last Princess (2008) re-appraised a Kurosawa classic through the priorities and influences of George Lucas’s Star Wars. Kazuaki Kiriya’s Goemon (2009) retold an old kabuki tale, re-imagined with the weight of a century of potboiler novels and schlocky ninja movies.
Some brilliant souls in South Korea are recreating Devil Fruits from One Piece in delicious looking, mouth-watering, cake form.
We’re super excited to welcome you to the Manga UK booth over Comic Con weekend - we’ve got loads of events and competitions planned and the whole team is raring to go!
Opposites may attract, but putting them together can result in chemical burns, electric shocks, and explosions.

Toshio Hirata 1938-2014

Remembering the anime master who shunned the limelight
Toshio Hirata, who died on 25th August, might be reasonably said to have avoided publicity. Over the course of his career, he did gather a number of credits for directing, as well as storyboards, key animation and lowlier tasks, but he often obscured his own achievements by using the pseudonym Sumiko Chiba. In some cases, such as for his work on Azuki-chan, he simply asked not to be credited at all, claiming that his contribution was not really worthy of recognition.

Gatchaman Crowds

Warning against surprise attacks by alien galaxies from beyond space
The colourfully mad Gatchaman Crowds is one of those anime which isn’t happy unless it’s doing umpteen things at once, all seeming completely different. It’s a campy, lowbrow action show and a thinky piece of SF and an otaku series with a taste for the meta and it’s anxious to engage with the real world. You can watch it just for the tangerine colours and the shouty panda. But if you want more pointers, read on…
Contact Us   |   Refund Policy   |   Delivery Times   |   Privacy statement   |   Terms & Conditions
Please note your card statement will show billing by MVM. Fullmetal Alchemist: Brotherhood OVA Collection from the UK's best Anime Blog.