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Monday 18th June 2012

Just saiyan that the Manga podcast is out...

Dragon Ball Z PodcastEpisode #4 of the Manga UK podcast is online now, with a special episode on the world of Dragon Ball Z (out on 2nd July). J-Pod regulars Jerome Mazandarani, Jeremy Graves and Jonathan Clements are joined by special guest Hollie B, Consumer PR and Community Executive from Namco-Bandai, for chat on anime production, games gossip, and just how far you can rock a dragon.

0:00:00-0:01:55 – Intro

0:01:55-0:22:37 - Dragon Ball Z for Kinect, Toonami, anime-related video games in the UK, Strike Witches Season 2 and Madoka Magica news.


0:22:37-0:38:50 - An introduction to the world of Dragon Ball Z including its origins, how anime studios cut corners.


0:38:50-1:19:24 - Ask Manga UK, the part of the show where we answer your questions from on Twitter and Facebook. Lots on DBZ, but there is still time for other topics including re-licensing titles, live-action movies, advertising (and how the Olympics will have an impact on that over the next few months), cinema screenings and more.

Click here to download.

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MANGA UK GOSSIP

Yu-gi-oh! Season 2 The Official Second Season (episodes 50-97)

£29.99
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After defeating Pegasus and winning back his grandfather's soul, Yugi and the spirit of the Millennium Puzzle begin to feel that this was not the end of their journey and that destiny has something more in store for them. These feelings are further fueled when a new enemy emerges: the mind-controlling Marik!
Marik is able to control the minds of those around him. With direct ties to ancient Egypt, Marik is plotting to take over the world by acquiring the powerful Egyptian God Cards and the seven Millennium Items, with the help of his henchmen!

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