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Monday 18th June 2012

Just saiyan that the Manga podcast is out...

Dragon Ball Z PodcastEpisode #4 of the Manga UK podcast is online now, with a special episode on the world of Dragon Ball Z (out on 2nd July). J-Pod regulars Jerome Mazandarani, Jeremy Graves and Jonathan Clements are joined by special guest Hollie B, Consumer PR and Community Executive from Namco-Bandai, for chat on anime production, games gossip, and just how far you can rock a dragon.

0:00:00-0:01:55 – Intro

0:01:55-0:22:37 - Dragon Ball Z for Kinect, Toonami, anime-related video games in the UK, Strike Witches Season 2 and Madoka Magica news.


0:22:37-0:38:50 - An introduction to the world of Dragon Ball Z including its origins, how anime studios cut corners.


0:38:50-1:19:24 - Ask Manga UK, the part of the show where we answer your questions from on Twitter and Facebook. Lots on DBZ, but there is still time for other topics including re-licensing titles, live-action movies, advertising (and how the Olympics will have an impact on that over the next few months), cinema screenings and more.

Click here to download.

Kame-Hame-Huh?

MANGA UK GOSSIP

Attack On Titan Part 2 (episodes 14-25)

£18.75
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Several hundred years ago, humans were nearly exterminated by giants. Giants are typically several stories tall, seem to have no intelligence, devour human beings and, worst of all, seem to do it for the pleasure rather than as a food source. A small percentage of humanity survived by enclosing themselves in a city protected by extremely high walls, even taller than the biggest of giants. Flash forward to the present and the city has not seen a giant in over 100 years. Teenage boy Eren and his foster sister Mikasa witness something horrific as the city walls are destroyed by a super giant that appears out of thin air. As the smaller giants flood the city, the two kids watch in horror as their mother is eaten alive. Eren vows that he will murder every single giant and take revenge for all of mankind.

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