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Manga UK Tries Sushi Noms!

Tuesday 29th March 2016


Working just a few minutes’ walk from London’s Japan Centre and the well-stocked supermarkets and corner shops of Chinatown, we’re spoilt for choice in terms of Asian snacks and Japanese goodies here at Manga UK - and pretty well-versed in the likes of Pocky, Hello Panda and Melty-Kiss. But when our friends over at Sushi Noms sent us over some of their favourite sweets, we realised we definitely still have a lot to learn about Japanese candy!

Sushi Noms
Sushi Noms sent us an AmaiBox GIGA (also available in the super cute MINI size) which definitely lived up to its name… The choice was pretty overwhelming! Along with Japanese junk-food staples like ramune and matcha Kit-Kats (a firm favourite!) came a whole host of exciting, unknown candies - gummies, marshmallows, flavoured chocolates, biscuits...

Sushi Noms
Our box also included a couple of totally kawaii pamphlets with a guide to Hiragana and Katakana characters, as well as a few useful words and phrases - you’ve gotta do something whilst scoffing all your awesome sweets, right?!

Sushi Noms
We absolutely loved the themed sweet packages - Yoda’s ‘Potelong’ (think ChipSticks) were absolutely delicious and the Star Wars chocolate wafer was the perfect afternoon snack. The Pokemon treats were sweet and fruity!

Sushi Noms
Our favourites were definitely the Naruto themed ramune and DIY gummy sushi kit - ramune bottles are always a novelty and you’ve got to love playing with your food!

Sushi Noms
All in all, our Sushi Noms box was totally sugoi, and the perfect accompaniment to a day spent marathoning your favourite anime (what do you mean, you’re not supposed to eat it all in one go?!). As a welcome gift, you can currently get 10% off your order at sushinoms.com with the promo code ‘mangauk’! They’ll also be at MCM Comic Con in May so why not pop by and say hi?

Have you had any of these goodies before? What would you like to try?

Arigatō, Sushi Noms! Mata-ne ;)

MANGA UK GOSSIP

Akira (the Collector\'s Edition) Triple Play Edition (incl. Blu-ray, Dvd, Digital Copy)

£22.49
sale_tag
was £29.99
Iconic and game-changing, Akira is the definitive anime masterpiece! Katsuhiro Otomo’s landmark cyberpunk classic obliterated the boundaries of Japanese animation and forced the world to look into the future. Akira’s arrival shattered traditional thinking, creating space for movies like The Matrix to be dreamed into brutal reality.

Neo-Tokyo, 2019. The city is being rebuilt post World War III when two high school drop outs, Kaneda and Tetsuo stumble across a secret government project to develop a new weapon - telekinetic humans. After Tetsuo is captured by the military and experimented on, he gains psychic abilities and learns about the existence of the project's most powerful subject, Akira. Both dangerous and destructive, Kaneda must take it upon himself to stop both Tetsuo and Akira before things get out of control and the city is destroyed once again. 
AKIRA The Collector’s Edition features both the original 1988 Streamline English dub and the 2001

Pioneer/Animaze English dub!

FEATURED RELEASE

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