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New Welcome to the Space Show clip

Saturday 23rd June 2012


A new exclusive clip from Welcome to the Space Show



Welcome to the Space Show is out on UK DVD and Blu-ray 2nd July -- pre-order now!

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Welcome To The Space Show

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Summer has finally arrived in the small, tight-knit community of Murakawa Village, where everyone practically knows everyone else. The population is so small that there’s only five children - Kiyoshi, Natsuki, Noriko, Koji and Amane - enrolled and studying together at the village elementary school. A most unusual incident occurs during summer camp, when they find and save an injured dog, who turns out to be an alien from outer space! The alien named Pochi invites the children for a trip to the moon, but due to an unexpected accident, they end up traveling through the universe on the wildest “school field trip” of their lives! “Ladies and Aliens! Welcome to THE SPACE SHOW!”

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