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Nine bests of the Ninja Scroll

Monday 8th October 2012


Pre-order your Ninja Scroll Blu-ray to get the best deal



The Ninja Scroll limited edition steelbook is coming next month, and is currently being offered to early birds at discounted prices. We can’t guarantee how long this price will hold, so get your pre-orders in now to avoid disappointment. But if that’s not enough of a reason to shell out for Yoshiaki Kawajiri, here are eight other reasons:

  1. Fully remastered Blu-ray.

  2. Bonus DVD edition in the same pack.

  3. Exclusive steelbook casing.

  4. Full colour wraparound artwork, front and back, as well as inside the steelbook.

  5. Director’s commentary by Yoshiaki Kawajiri – painstakingly translated and subtitled, and approved by Madhouse Studios.

  6. Limited edition only available in the UK and Ireland.

  7. Bonus 20-page Ninja Scroll booklet by Jonathan Clements, author of A Brief History of the Samurai.

  8. Includes the original uncut theatrical release (BBFC-rated 18) of Ninja Scroll, digitally re-mastered in stunning HD.


Buy it now

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Ninja Scroll

£3.99
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was £19.99
A ninja-for-hire is forced into fighting an old nemesis who is bent on overthrowing the Japanese government. His nemesis is also the leader of a group of demons each with superhuman powers.

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Ninja Scroll

Andrew Osmond on the Kawajiri classic
“Look’s like a storm’s brewing,” comments the wandering swordsman Jubei at the start of Yoshiaki Kawajiri’s action classic, Ninja Scroll. Its opening minutes are full of portents. In the first scene, Jubei moseys across a wooden bridge, like a gunslinger at high noon; pity the fools who mess with him. We see riders framed by a raging sea; crows peck at dead villagers. Soon the action is soaring, as ninja warriors leap through tree branches, fighting a giant with a skin of rock. Strap yourself in; any dangling limbs are liable to be lopped off.

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Andrew Osmond on one of anime’s holy trinity
Ninja Scroll is crammed with memorable images, set-pieces and characters. Like many of the best international anime hits, the contents of Ninja Scroll are foreign yet familiar. Instead of the future megacities of Akira, we’re deep in the Japanese countryside. We’re weaving through fog and fireflies, springing through treetops, sneaking down rivers, hanging halfway down stone cliffs.

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Aesthetica of a Rogue Hero

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Andrew Osmond catches the live-action premiere of Hitoshi Iwaaki’s Kiseiju
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High School DxD

Hugh, phew, barneys and boobs, cutthroats, demons and blood...
If this show dropped all the extreme fan-service it would still be an exciting action-horror adventure, not far removed from an extended arc of Supernatural or the like. As it is, you get that and a show that would have broken the jiggle counter if anime DVDs still had them. After decades of evolution, even harem comedies can produce a show with some substance.

Fairy Tail Music: Daisy x Daisy

Tom Smith on Fairy Tail Part 7’s opening theme
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“Try ‘n boogie, guns n’ tattoo” – there’s no greater embodiment of Kenichi Asai’s work than that opening line. As the words are dragged across the bluesy, rock n’ roll riff of Mad Surfer – the Japanese rebel’s song used as the 20th closing of Bleach – it’s difficult not to imagine smoke filled bars, motorcycles or leather jacketed misfits sporting hairdos your mother wouldn’t approve of.

Tokyo Tribe

Andrew Osmond on a rap musical, in Japanese. Yes. Thank you. You’re welcome.
Represent! The live-action film of Akira is here… and it’s a rap musical! Okay, we’re kidding, but Tokyo Tribe takes place in a violent fantasy Tokyo of warring gangs, hence the film’s name. It’s based on a manga strip and takes a manically cartoonish approach to its material.
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