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Nine bests of the Ninja Scroll

Monday 8th October 2012

Pre-order your Ninja Scroll Blu-ray to get the best deal



The Ninja Scroll limited edition steelbook is coming next month, and is currently being offered to early birds at discounted prices. We can’t guarantee how long this price will hold, so get your pre-orders in now to avoid disappointment. But if that’s not enough of a reason to shell out for Yoshiaki Kawajiri, here are eight other reasons:

  1. Fully remastered Blu-ray.

  2. Bonus DVD edition in the same pack.

  3. Exclusive steelbook casing.

  4. Full colour wraparound artwork, front and back, as well as inside the steelbook.

  5. Director’s commentary by Yoshiaki Kawajiri – painstakingly translated and subtitled, and approved by Madhouse Studios.

  6. Limited edition only available in the UK and Ireland.

  7. Bonus 20-page Ninja Scroll booklet by Jonathan Clements, author of A Brief History of the Samurai.

  8. Includes the original uncut theatrical release (BBFC-rated 18) of Ninja Scroll, digitally re-mastered in stunning HD.


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Nine bests of the Ninja Scroll

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Ninja Scroll

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A ninja-for-hire is forced into fighting an old nemesis who is bent on overthrowing the Japanese government. His nemesis is also the leader of a group of demons each with superhuman powers.

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Ninja Scroll

Andrew Osmond on the Kawajiri classic
“Look’s like a storm’s brewing,” comments the wandering swordsman Jubei at the start of Yoshiaki Kawajiri’s action classic, Ninja Scroll. Its opening minutes are full of portents. In the first scene, Jubei moseys across a wooden bridge, like a gunslinger at high noon; pity the fools who mess with him. We see riders framed by a raging sea; crows peck at dead villagers. Soon the action is soaring, as ninja warriors leap through tree branches, fighting a giant with a skin of rock. Strap yourself in; any dangling limbs are liable to be lopped off.

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