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Podcast #13

Monday 17th December 2012


God bless us, every one, it's the Manga UK podcast


Manga UK PodcastIn this festive edition, Jeremy Graves is joined by Jerome Mazandarani and Andrew Hewson for the last podcast of the year, which features new announcements, your questions answered and our exclusive Manga UK festive treat, a rhyming narrative of Yuletide cheer, which features reindeer, anime fans, bondage gear and our Christmas Eve releases.

00:00 Settle down at the fireside for Uncle Jeremy to read you your special Christmas poem.

05:09 Introductions and current releases, and the Hetalia box set explained, plus what’s coming up on Christmas Eve.

10:00 “Brand spanking new news” – 3 new license announcements plus a surprise! But don’t get your hopes up for One Piece, there’s no news on that.

18:30 Dragon Ball Z Kai now confirmed for British television.

24:00 Ask Manga UK – details on the upcoming Bleach arcs. How can UK anime match up to American and Australian fandom? The perils of predicting what will be a hit when buying licences.

42:30 What chances of remakes of classic anime in the wake of Evangelion and Berserk?

45:00 What have we asked Santa for Christmas? Do not listen to this if Jerome is your dad.

Available to download now, or find it and an archive of previous shows at our iTunes page. For a detailed contents listing of previous podcasts, check out our Podcasts page.

Podcast #13

MANGA UK GOSSIP

Persona 4 The Animation - Complete Season Box Set (episodes 1-25)

£33.75
sale_tag
was £44.99
When Yu Narukami moves to the country town of Inaba to stay with his uncle and cousin, he's expecting a lot more peace and quiet than he's used to in the big city. What he isn't expecting is for his uncle's job as a police detective to spill over into his own life, or for the murders that are occurring across town to be somehow linked to Yu's own strange experiences, odd local weather patterns, and a mysterious TV show world that seems to be attempting to get Yu to enter it!
Now, together with a new group of friends, Yu must plunge into a bizarre alternate reality where he gains unique abilities that will either help him solve the riddle of the mystery killer... or lead him to his doom.
Contains Episodes 1-25 of the Acclaimed Aniime Series
Languages include: Japanese, English and English Subtitles
Bonus: Episode 1 “Director’s Cut”, Japanese TV Spot, Omake Drama (Episodes 1-4), Episode 26 OVA, True End Spot, Clean Opening 2nd Period, Clean Ending Arcane

FEATURED RELEASE

RELATED BLOG ARTICLES

Persona 4: The Animation

Helen McCarthy tries to avoid getting sucked into the screen
There's nothing new under the sun. The idea of people caught inside a TV screen isn't new, even in anime: Video Girl Ai did the same thing back in the days of cassette tape. The idea that in another reality, you have special powers and a vital purpose, has been exploited by shows from Sailor Moon to Vision of Escaflowne. The displaced teen hero is found in myriad places, from Princess Mononoke's early Japan to Fullmetal Alchemist's Nazi Europe. The sentai concept, the teen-led team with its mix of strengths and mutual respect goes all the way back to the 60s, with Osamu Tezuka's puppet adventure Galaxy Boy Troop predating 1966 anime Rainbow Sentai Robin.

Unboxed: Persona 4

Jeremy Graves checks out the set
Jeremy Graves checks out the set.

Persona 4's video game origins

Matt Kamen on the video-game origins of Persona 4
Persona 4 was originally released in 2008 on the PlayStation 2 and is currently available in brilliantly enhanced form as Persona 4 Golden on the PlayStation Vita. While the tale of the nameless hero (Yu Narukami in the anime) and his friends in the small but macabre town of Inaba became arguably the most popular entry in the Persona series of role-playing games, it was far from the first.

Unboxed: Persona 4 the Animation 2

Jeremy Graves gets to grips with the new DVD
Jeremy Graves gets to grips with the new DVD

The end of Persona 4: The Animation

Andrew Osmond on the final part of Persona 4: The Animation
The third and last volume of Persona 4 The Animation – released like its predecessors as a Blu-ray/DVD combo pack – shows the full spectrum of the series. The first volume was adventure-heavy, as hero Yu and his growing circle of friends sought the serial killer dispatching victims in the country town of Inaba; a mystery linked to a foggy fantasy world behind the TV screen. The second volume tied up – well, seemed to tie up – that arc early on, then told lighter-hearted stories tying into the show’s theme of friendship. However, Volume 2 ended with another action-heavy story confirming that the serial-killer mystery wasn’t solved, and recruiting the last warrior in Yu’s band of heroes – the cross-dressing “boy” detective Naoto, voiced by Japanese actress Romi Park (Edward Elric in Fullmetal Alchemist Brotherhood).

RECENT FEATURED POSTS

This week we have the brilliant World Conquest Zvezda Plot and RWBY Volume 2 for you to add to your collections!

Jimmy Murakami 1933-2014

Andrew Osmond remembers the man who did it all
By way of an obituary, we re-run Andrew Osmond's interview with the late Jimmy Murakami, originally published in March 2012.

Kite: Live Action

Samuel L. Jackson brings Yasuomi Umetsu's anime to life
Kite the movie will be released on UK DVD and Blu-ray by Anchor Bay on 13th October.

Tajomaru: Avenging Blade

Jonathan Clements goes in search of groove in a grove
Tajomaru: Avenging Blade is part of a trend in filmmaking that has seen a number of Japanese classics approached from new angles. In Hollywood, we have the Satsuma Rebellion retooled in The Last Samurai, and Keanu Reeves already at work on the forthcoming Forty-seven Ronin. Within Japan, Sogo Ishii’s Gojoe (2000) replayed a famous samurai legend with a gritty, glossy, pop sensibility. Shinji Higuchi’s Hidden Fortress: The Last Princess (2008) re-appraised a Kurosawa classic through the priorities and influences of George Lucas’s Star Wars. Kazuaki Kiriya’s Goemon (2009) retold an old kabuki tale, re-imagined with the weight of a century of potboiler novels and schlocky ninja movies.
Animatsu Entertainment is proud to announce that the highly anticipated live-action feature Attack on Titan: Part 1 will be released in UK cinemas from 1st December.

Robots in Anime and Manga

Man-made humans, mecha and merchandising
Japan’s technophilia was born and fostered during the Meiji Era (1868-1912), as it sought to catch up with the American and European powers that came knocking on its door and opened the country up to the wider world.

Wolf Children and Families

In search of Mamoru Hosoda’s family ties
The Wolf Children is a family film about a family. This may help explain while Mamoru Hosoda’s movie was a hit in Japan, something that’s very unusual for a standalone cartoon film not linked to an entrenched brand. A well-rounded portrait of a family offers many ways in for different generations. The Wolf Children is the story of an unassuming ‘ordinary’ mum who must find reserves of superhuman strength; of a rambunctious girl and a troubled boy, each with different relationships to their animal sides; of a magic, mythic love between a human woman and a gentle werewolf; and of everyday, practical living away from city lights and mod-cons.

A Kim Jong-Il Production

Jasper Sharp reviews a book on the maddest film producer of all
Paul Fischer’s hugely entertaining book, A Kim Il-Sung Production, is the story of two men who lived, ate and breathed cinema, the actress who brought them together and the monster they created together – the Godzilla-inspired Pulgasari (1985), the last of seven features Shin and Choi made in the DPRK in a period of just three years.

Nisekoi

Andrew Osmond on an anime with a distinctive look
Boy meets girl; boy and girl hate each other; boy and girl learn they’re both children of gangster families and must pretend to be lovers to prevent gang war. Naturally there are rival suitors on both sides of the fractious pair, ranging from a sweet girl-next-door type to a pistol-packing assassin.

Giovanni's Island

Jonathan Clements on this season’s classy anime feature
Ever willing to poke around in the interstices of history for children’s stories of the war, the Japanese animation industry alights here on the true story of Hiroshi Tokuno, on whose life story this film is partly based.
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