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Podcast #7

Monday 10th September 2012

Libellous accusations, inadvisable confessions and your questions answered, in the Manga UK podcast

Manga UK PodcastThe Manga UK podcast is back for its seventh episode, in which Jerome Mazandarani wins friends and influences people in Norwich, Rory Doona discusses the world of Know Your Anime, Andrew Hewson sobs in the corner and Jonathan Clements reveals the inner workings of the Happiness Project. Meanwhile, Jeremy Graves can't get enough Princess Jellyfist.

Start - 00:03:26  Pre-show chatter including the Contemporary Japanese Media symposium in Norwich.
00:03:26 - 00:15:04  Cliffhanger question answered -- what's changed about anime and fans in the UK? Includes a gratuitous plug for the new translation of the Art of War.

00:15:04 - 00:44:56  Gangnam style, Manga UK news + September releases, Rory speaks, although not for long.

00:44:56 - 1:04:20  Pay-per-view for Initial D, Anime & the Oscars, the zen question regarding the difference between coming third and coming fourth.

1:04:20 - 1:54:15 [End]  Ask Manga UK, including details of the Bandai Europe piranha tank and jibes directed at people called Tony and companies called Sony.

Available to download now, or find it and an archive of previous shows at our iTunes page.

Podcast #7

MANGA UK GOSSIP

K-on! Season 2 Complete Collection

£29.99
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was £39.99
The show's not over until the band says it's over!
Sometimes music and words come together so perfectly that the combination is far more powerful than either would be alone. In much the same way, the five members of the Sakuragaoka Girl's High School's Light Music Club have become far more than just a group of girls with similar interests. More, even, than just a group of friends. Through the medium of music they've found a common course in life, and whatever the future may bring, they know they can get through it if they stand together. Which makes the coming end of the school year and the graduation of the four older members something that's dreaded as much as it's looked forward to. But in the meantime there's so much going on, it's as if life has decided to throw everything it can at them. Going to music festivals won't be hard to swing, but running a marathon? That will be a stretch! Yearbook photos? The horror! And a school play with Mio and Ritsu cast as Romeo and Juliet? Ooo, VERY awkward. And then, of course, there's one big final performance for the band! The tempo is rising and emotions run wild as the final encore approaches in K-ON!! Season 2 Collection 2!!

FEATURED RELEASE

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K-On!, the TV series, adapting the manga about high-school girls forming a rock band at school, has after two seasons on TV spun off into a theatrical feature. A tradition of the TV business internationally, the subject matter is also a typical spin-off tradition: taking the main characters abroad for fish-out-of-water hijinks (see The Inbetweeners for another recent example). Where The InBetweeners has been a raucous success in the U.K. for showing accurately just how vile and stupid teenage boys really are however, K-On! has broken new ground in Japan by being a female-fronted series with considerable behind-the-scenes female talent, who are making a show that eschews fan-service in favour of greater realism, and this has continued with the movie.

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