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Podcast #7

Monday 10th September 2012

Libellous accusations, inadvisable confessions and your questions answered, in the Manga UK podcast

Manga UK PodcastThe Manga UK podcast is back for its seventh episode, in which Jerome Mazandarani wins friends and influences people in Norwich, Rory Doona discusses the world of Know Your Anime, Andrew Hewson sobs in the corner and Jonathan Clements reveals the inner workings of the Happiness Project. Meanwhile, Jeremy Graves can't get enough Princess Jellyfist.

Start - 00:03:26  Pre-show chatter including the Contemporary Japanese Media symposium in Norwich.
00:03:26 - 00:15:04  Cliffhanger question answered -- what's changed about anime and fans in the UK? Includes a gratuitous plug for the new translation of the Art of War.

00:15:04 - 00:44:56  Gangnam style, Manga UK news + September releases, Rory speaks, although not for long.

00:44:56 - 1:04:20  Pay-per-view for Initial D, Anime & the Oscars, the zen question regarding the difference between coming third and coming fourth.

1:04:20 - 1:54:15 [End]  Ask Manga UK, including details of the Bandai Europe piranha tank and jibes directed at people called Tony and companies called Sony.

Available to download now, or find it and an archive of previous shows at our iTunes page.

Podcast #7

MANGA UK GOSSIP

Dragon Ball Z: Battle Of Gods

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Stunning animation and epic new villains highlight the first new Dragon Ball Z feature film in seventeen years! Beerus, the God of Destruction, travels to Earth in search of a good fight. Only Goku, humanity’s greatest hero, can ascend to the level of a Super Saiyan God and stop Beerus’s rampage!
This double disc edition includes both the 85 minute Theatrical Cut and the 105 minute Director’s Cut. Both versions include the English and Japanese dubs and English subtitles. This edition also includes bonus content including “The Voices of Dragon Ball Z: Unveiled” and “Behind The Scenes: Battle of Voice Actors!”.

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The history of Dragon Ball Z

Matt Kamen on the history of Dragon Ball Z
Launched in 1984 in the pages of Shueisha’s Weekly Shonen Jump, Akira Toriyama’s original Dragon Ball was a very different beast to the one western viewers would eventually meet. introduced the boisterous Son Goku, an adventurous and unusally strong boy with no social graces whatsoever. Raised in seclusion by his adoptive grandfather, he doesn’t even that know what girls are – making for some prime gag moments when he meets treasure hunter Bulma. Soon teaming up, the pair track down seven rare ‘Dragon Balls’ – powerful items that can summon the wish-granting dragon Shenron. These early stories were very loosely based on Chinese fables but Toriyama gave them a fresh twist, his distinctive art style and perfect balance of comedy and action making the series a hit.

The cast of Dragon Ball Z #1

A first look at the who'z who in Dragon Ball Z

Son Goku. Goku was originally cast as a naive but powerful young boy who was spurred onto the path of adventure following the death of his grandfather. By the time Dragon Ball Z rolls around, Goku’s a full-grown adult, the victor of several martial arts tournaments and a married man. He’s only slightly less naive though, and his strict wife Chichi frequently has to rein in his less socially acceptable habits and wilder impulses. The first arc of the series marks Goku learning of his alien origins for the first time – before meeting other Saiyans, he thought he was just another average monkey-tailed boy!

The cast of Dragon Ball Z #2

The next instalment in our character guide for Dragon Ball Z
Yamcha. One of Goku’s oldest friends – even if they did first meet as enemies! A reformed desert bandit and an ex-boyfriend of Bulma, Yamcha is one of the strongest human fighters in the world. Having regularly entered World Martial Arts Tournaments and fought against a multitude of foes, he’s earned his place as one of the core Z-Fighters. However, he was overpowered and killed by one of Nappa’s drones in the Saiyan invasion of Earth. Luckily, death is rarely the end in the world of Dragon Ball, and Yamcha’s path continues as he trains under King Kai in the afterlife, preparing for a return to the living world to help his friends against the threats they’ll face on the distant planet Namek.

The cast of Dragon Ball Z #3

The third instalment in our character guide for Dragon Ball Z
And so we continue filling you in on the heroes and villains to keep an eye on in the latest super-charged volume of the famous action epic!

The cast of Dragon Ball Z #4

The fourth instalment in our character guide for Dragon Ball Z
With a cast of dozens, there still more to fill you in on the heroes and villains to keep an eye on in the latest super-charged volume of the famous action epic!

The cast of Dragon Ball Z #5

The fifth instalment in our character guide for Dragon Ball Z
Cell. The deadliest enemy the Z Warriors have ever had to face – themselves! Cell is a hyper-advanced android from the future, created using the DNA of the present day heroes and possessing all their skills and abilities thanks to genetic memory. Goku’s Kamehameha? Cell can use it and counter it. Tien’s Solar Flare? Just one of Cell’s basic attacks. Piccolo’s regeneration? That serves to make Cell even more difficult to defeat. Already an incredibly powerful figure, Cell has travelled back in time to physically absorb more fighters and add their powers to his own repertoire. His goal? To achieve his Perfect Form and become the mightiest figure in the Universe – and he won’t let anything or anyone stand in his way.

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Who's Who in Dragon Ball 1

Ever wonder just how Goku and friends became the greatest heroes on Earth?
Wonder no more, as the original Dragon Ball reveals the origins of Akira Toriyama’s beloved creations! The faces may look familiar, but everything else is different in this classic series!

Schoolgirls, Money and Rebellion in Japan

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Andrew Osmond on Japan's chances at this year's Academy Awards
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Some of you may have heard that the US release of the hotly anticipated Evangelion 3.33: You Can (Not) Redo has been delayed. Unfortunately we can now confirm that this has had a knock-on effect for the UK DVD and Blu-ray release and as a result we have been forced to amend the release date. We are very sorry for this but it is beyond our control.

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Helen McCarthy on anime's football crazies
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