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Podcast #7

Monday 10th September 2012

Libellous accusations, inadvisable confessions and your questions answered, in the Manga UK podcast

Manga UK PodcastThe Manga UK podcast is back for its seventh episode, in which Jerome Mazandarani wins friends and influences people in Norwich, Rory Doona discusses the world of Know Your Anime, Andrew Hewson sobs in the corner and Jonathan Clements reveals the inner workings of the Happiness Project. Meanwhile, Jeremy Graves can't get enough Princess Jellyfist.

Start - 00:03:26  Pre-show chatter including the Contemporary Japanese Media symposium in Norwich.
00:03:26 - 00:15:04  Cliffhanger question answered -- what's changed about anime and fans in the UK? Includes a gratuitous plug for the new translation of the Art of War.

00:15:04 - 00:44:56  Gangnam style, Manga UK news + September releases, Rory speaks, although not for long.

00:44:56 - 1:04:20  Pay-per-view for Initial D, Anime & the Oscars, the zen question regarding the difference between coming third and coming fourth.

1:04:20 - 1:54:15 [End]  Ask Manga UK, including details of the Bandai Europe piranha tank and jibes directed at people called Tony and companies called Sony.

Available to download now, or find it and an archive of previous shows at our iTunes page.

Podcast #7

MANGA UK GOSSIP

Yu-gi-oh! Season 2 The Official Second Season (episodes 50-97)

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After defeating Pegasus and winning back his grandfather's soul, Yugi and the spirit of the Millennium Puzzle begin to feel that this was not the end of their journey and that destiny has something more in store for them. These feelings are further fueled when a new enemy emerges: the mind-controlling Marik!
Marik is able to control the minds of those around him. With direct ties to ancient Egypt, Marik is plotting to take over the world by acquiring the powerful Egyptian God Cards and the seven Millennium Items, with the help of his henchmen!

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