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Nabari no Ou music: Sickle Valley

Monday 30th January 2012


Nabari no OuThere's more than just ninja in the life of Yuhki Kamatani, original creator of this week's DVD box release Nabari no Ou. Kamatani, whose name in Japanese means "Sickle Valley", keeps a sketchbook of beautiful, romantic images of everyday life and flights of fancy, some of which can be found on her website Crow Wings.

Ms Kamatani also can't seem to stay away from Twitter, where she discusses art materials with her Japanese fans,and ponders the need to get waterproof pens and paper, just in case inspiration strikes while she's in the bath.

Nabari no Ou, the Complete Box Set, is out now on UK DVD from Manga Entertainment.

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Nabari No Ou Complete Series Collection

£23.99
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was £39.99
In the shadows of this modern world, ninjas fight for control of an ancient technique which holds untold strength. This coveted power dwells within apathetic Miharu, a fact the guy really couldn’t care less about – until the clashing rival clans bring their battle to him.
Now Miharu struggles to understand the mystery buried in his soul, and must choose a side if he hopes to survive. But when conflict is waged in secret, and lethal ninjas hide in plain sight, friend and foe prove difficult to tell apart.

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