0 Items | £0.00

VIEW BASKET

Mamoru Hosoda talks Summer Wars

Sunday 29th May 2011


Summer Wars director Mamoru Hosoda talks to Andrew Osmond about samurai, grannies and the internet.

Mamoru Hosada

In Summer Wars, the main character is a boy, the shy maths prodigy Kenji. Do you prefer telling a story through a male or a female character?

It depends on the story. But this time I might prefer the boy's point of view because my last film (The Girl who Leapt through Time) was about a girl and its story was told through her eyes.

Love Machine, the artificial “villain” in the film, seems to have the personality of a violent school bully, who loves beating other people up.

Summer Wars

I think he’s more like a little child than a violent bully. He might not have the intention of doing harm to other people or to the world. He was programmed to study and grow by himself. His curiosity and longing for knowledge brought the world into chaos.

You show the internet as a wonderful place where people can communicate and work together. Do you think that people have unfair prejudices against the internet?

Anything in this world has both good and bad aspects. But, do you think our world has become worse and more uncomfortable after the rise of the Internet? We cannot imagine how much more convenient and comfortable our lives have become in this IT era. I think considering the Internet as just a bad technology is nonsense today.

In Summer Wars, young and old people can all work together successfully. Are you optimistic that different generations of people can communicate?

I'm very optimistic about that. Following on from the previous question, the Internet itself has played a great role in cross-generation communication. Thanks to the Internet, I can have more opportunities to talk with lots of people who are younger and older than me than ever before.

Summer Wars

Also, in Summer Wars, you seem to say that “old Japan” (the country’s samurai history) and “new Japan” (the virtual computer world) can exist together, and they can make each other stronger. This is different from other anime, in which Japan's old traditions are being threatened by modern Japan.

Every director has his/her own way of seeing and describing a world. But more than anything, I always try to make a film which says our world is beautiful and worth living in. I think that's the reason Summer Wars is a little bit different from other anime.

Do you feel that “old Japan” and “new Japan” can exist together?

Yes. Definitely.

Sakae, the great-grandmother, is an amazingly strong and vivid character in the film. Is she inspired by a real person?

Every character is inspired by people I know, I like and respect. Sakae is inspired by lots of people; maybe they include my great-grandmother, my grandmother and my mother.

Summer WarsCan you say a little more about Sakae (the great-grandmother character) and what values she represents? In particular, I was thinking of the speech she makes to the family, which is very moving.

What Sakae wants to say is: hold tight as a family; help each other; never leave any family member lonely and hungry. Isn't this a kind of common sense all “mothers” have all over the world?

Finally, the computer avatars in the film are mostly cute and funny. If you had to choose an avatar, would you choose a cute one?

Summer WarsI think I would choose a very cute one hoping girls would get interested in my avatar.:)

Mamoru Hosoda's Summer Wars is out now on UK DVD and Blu-ray from Manga Entertainment.

MANGA UK GOSSIP

Summer Wars

£5.99
sale_tag
was £17.99
THE JAPANESE BOX OFFICE SENSATION!
From the visionary director of The Girl Who Leapt Through Time (2007 Japanese Academy Award winner, Best Animated Feature) comes the story of an ordinary family going to extraordinary lengths to avert the impending cyber apocalypse!
Kenji is your typical teenage misfit. He's good at math, bad with girls, and spends most of his time hanging out in the all-powerful, online community known as OZ. His second life is the only life he has until the girl of his dreams, Natsuki, hijacks him for a starring role as a fake fiance at her family reunion. Things only get stranger from there. A late-night email containing a cryptic mathematic riddle leads to the unleashing of a rogue AI intent on using the virtual word of OZ to destroy the real world, literarily. As Armageddon looms on the horizon, Kenji and his new family set aside their differences and band together to save the worlds they inhabit in this near-perfect blend of social satire and science fiction. (AnimeNewsNetwork.com) First Press includes collectible art cards.

FEATURED RELEASE

RELATED BLOG ARTICLES

Mamoru Hosoda's Summer Wars

Jonathan Clements gets into the hidden meanings of Mamoru Hosoda's Summer Wars.
“You know,” says Mamoru Hosoda, “I have been directing films for over a decade, and until now I haven’t killed off a single human being. I’m a little bit proud of that. I ask another director how they’re doing, and they’ve already lost track of the body count! I’ve made a lot of works for children with Toei Animation in the past, so obviously that steers me towards a certain resistance to death. But even in Summer Wars, I resisted the death that we had in the script, even though it was clear that it was a narrative necessity. It was a big challenge for me.”

SWORD ART ONLINE VS SUMMER WARS

Andrew Osmond says, if you like that, you might like this…
Summer Wars and Sword Art Online are made for a generation who’ve grown up with and within virtuality: social networks, video streaming, games without borders or ends. Both anime are adventures about things going wrong in cyberspace, but neither are technophobic; on the contrary, they’re all about hugging the avatar.

RECENT FEATURED POSTS

Pokémon: Hoopa and the Clash of Ages will be released on DVD and Blu-ray on October 24th.

Psycho-Pass

Who watches the watchmen watching your thoughts...?
Psycho-Pass; the first half of the name should warn you. This is a blend of SF and horror by the studio which brought you Ghost in the Shell, now splicing cyberpunk, police procedural and splatter. There will be blood, and dismembered body parts, and if no-one’s actually eaten a human liver on the show yet, there’s still Psycho-Pass 2 to come.

Gatchaman Crowds

Warning against surprise attacks by alien galaxies from beyond space
The colourfully mad Gatchaman Crowds is one of those anime which isn’t happy unless it’s doing umpteen things at once, all seeming completely different. It’s a campy, lowbrow action show and a thinky piece of SF and an otaku series with a taste for the meta and it’s anxious to engage with the real world. You can watch it just for the tangerine colours and the shouty panda. But if you want more pointers, read on…

From Naruto to Fairy Tail

Paul Browne on the music of Yasuharu Takanashi
Two high-profile Manga Entertainment releases have something in common in the form of musician and composer Yasuharu Takanashi. It’s the distinctive musical strokes of Takanashi that appear on the new Naruto movie The Lost Tower as well as the upcoming movie addition to the Fairy Tail series – Phoenix Priestess.

The Films of Shinya Tsukamoto

Jasper Sharp is in a Tokyo state of mind
The hyperrealism of the “cartoon” Akira and the cartoonishness of the live-action Tetsuo struck Western viewers unaccustomed to such mould-breaking cinema with equal force, and it is no real surprise to note that Manga Entertainment was responsible for the subsequent releases of both Tsukamoto’s big-budget colour rerun of his debut, Tetsuo II: Bodyhammer (1992) and his later Tokyo Fist.

Wolf Children Tweet-a-long

Join us on Wednesday for Mamoru Oshii's anime masterpiece
Join us on Wednesday 8th January to watch Wolf Children and tweet our own commentary.

Naruto Music: Asian Kung Fu Generation

Tom Smith on the Britmaniacs behind the Naruto theme.
They’re so loud and proud that they insist on writing it all in caps: ASIAN KUNG-FU GENERATION – possibly one of Japan’s most important alternative rock acts. The group’s tenth single ‘After Dark’ makes for the energetic, guitar-heavy opening theme to the latest volume of Bleach, released in the UK this month, and the group’s sound might at first seem reminiscent of America’s indie scene dashed with elements of punk, it actually has a lot more in common with The Who, their generation, and the sea of British-based guitar heroes that have appeared since.
Contact Us   |   Refund Policy   |   Delivery Times   |   Privacy statement   |   Terms & Conditions
Please note your card statement will show billing by MVM. Mamoru Hosoda talks Summer Wars from the UK's best Anime Blog.