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Finding the Sweet Spot with Vampybitme

Friday 15th July 2011


Internet phenomenon Vampybitme, a.k.a. Linda Le, volunteered to be our voice acting boot camp guinea pig. So we flew her off to Bang! Zoom Entertainment to try her skills on the Evangelion video blog. If you thought it was as easy as standing in front of a microphone, then prepare to be amazed. Where should you stand, for starters...? How does the depth of your voice affect the sound quality? How do you feel right now, and how does that affect your performance...?



And check out the result -- Vampy's own version of the Evangelion 2.22 video blog from our own Manga website.

MANGA UK GOSSIP

Evangelion 2.22 You Can (not) Advance

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New Pilots, New Evas, New Angels
The landmark anime Evangelion evolves, reaching new heights of intensity in the new feature film: Evangelion 2.22. In this explosive new story, brutal action and primal emotion clash as a group of young pilots maneuver their towering, cyborg Eva Units into combat against a deadly and disturbing enemy.
In the battle to prevent the apocalyptic Third Impact, Shinji and Rei were forced to carry humanity’s hopes on their shoulders. Now, as the onslaught of the bizarre, monstrous Angels escalates, they find their burden shared by two new Eva pilots, the fiery Asuka and the mysterious Mari. In this thrilling new experience for fans of giant robot destruction, the young pilots fight desperately to save mankind – and struggle to save themselves.

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