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Why Going to Tokyo Disney After Six on a Weekday is Awesome

Tuesday 26th January 2016


Tokyo Disney
There is simply no denying that Land, Sea or Air, anything remotely related to Disney is mandatorily intrinsic of good times. Anyone beginning to feel the weight of the world on their shoulders can escape the hostilities of the daily grind and immerse themselves in all things bright and beautiful. Words of caution though; there are dangers lurking beyond the peripherals of those rose-tinted glasses. A few factors that are decidedly un-fun and occasionally even threaten to poison the branded, Mickey-themed chalice.

Pick your peeve; crowds, lines, heat, dehydration or even your favourite costumed character turning feral, clawing your eyes out with foam-padded gloves.

Amagi Brilliant Park
Now imagine being spared of all that. Imagine being able to wander around freely like the king of pop in your own personal Neverland. All you have to do is wait for the sun to disappear and the riff-raff to shamble off home. Over-tired, shrieking children in tow.

Night time at Tokyo Disney is an entirely different animal; older, more sophisticated, better educated. It’s a time to relax and take in your surroundings, instead of being bombarded by them, making it prime time for an older clientele.

Tokyo Disney
Park attendants seem to be in a better mood in general; partially attributed to the fact their shift will shortly be ending, but part of it seems that they finally have some room to breathe. With the undulating masses dispersed they can chat to each other and the older demographic of guests, maybe even use the English they were forced to learn with the non-natives.

With the longest wait for a ride being around the 45 minute mark and the average being between 5-20, all rides can be sampled and favourites can be revisited in the closing minutes before skipping out of the front gates.

Theme Park
Granted, it can be a little strange hearing all of your favourite characters firing hyper-speed Japanese at you, but if you think an evening of Disney fun isn't worth 4000 yen, you’d be hard pressed to find something that is…Scrooge McDuck.

Have you been to Tokyo Disneyland or Sea? Is it somewhere you'd like to visit? Let us know on Twitter and Facebook.

MANGA UK GOSSIP

Akira (the Collector\'s Edition) Triple Play Edition (incl. Blu-ray, Dvd, Digital Copy)

£22.49
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was £29.99
Iconic and game-changing, Akira is the definitive anime masterpiece! Katsuhiro Otomo’s landmark cyberpunk classic obliterated the boundaries of Japanese animation and forced the world to look into the future. Akira’s arrival shattered traditional thinking, creating space for movies like The Matrix to be dreamed into brutal reality.

Neo-Tokyo, 2019. The city is being rebuilt post World War III when two high school drop outs, Kaneda and Tetsuo stumble across a secret government project to develop a new weapon - telekinetic humans. After Tetsuo is captured by the military and experimented on, he gains psychic abilities and learns about the existence of the project's most powerful subject, Akira. Both dangerous and destructive, Kaneda must take it upon himself to stop both Tetsuo and Akira before things get out of control and the city is destroyed once again. 
AKIRA The Collector’s Edition features both the original 1988 Streamline English dub and the 2001

Pioneer/Animaze English dub!

FEATURED RELEASE

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Your chance to see it in the cinema in the UK
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The Art of Akira

Joe Peacock tracks down the original images from the anime classic
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